Seconal Withdrawal

Although it was once commonly prescribed for insomnia and anxiety, today Seconal, also known as Seconal Sodium (generic name secobarbital), is mainly used to euthanize animals and in cases of physician-assisted suicide. It is rarely prescribed anymore due to the dangers associated with barbiturates, but it is still purchased illegally on the black market and used recreationally. For those who abuse or develop a dependence on the drug, Seconal withdrawal can be difficult as the withdrawal symptoms are severe and can be deadly.

What Are the Seconal Withdrawal Symptoms?

Seconal is a central nervous system depressant that binds to the GABA neurotransmitters in the brain. This allows it to trick the brain into thinking that it is GABA and cause the brain to produce excess GABA. This is what causes the sensations of deep relaxation and sleep. The difference between a prescribed dose and overdose is small, which means it’s critical to follow the prescribed dose. It also can be easy to develop a dependence on or addiction to this drug because of its powerful sedative effects. If you become addicted to it, trying to stop taking Seconal can be a challenge. Symptoms of Seconal withdrawal can be extremely uncomfortable and even lethal, just like withdrawing from other barbiturates.

Seconal withdrawal symptoms:

  • Anxiety
  • Muscle twitching
  • Tremor
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Distorted vision
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Low blood pressure
  • Convulsions
  • Delirium
  • Hallucinations
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Death

YOU’RE NOT ALONE AND WE CAN HELP. ENTER YOUR PHONE NUMBER TO RECEIVE A CALL FROM A TREATMENT SPECIALIST.

YOU’RE NOT ALONE AND WE CAN HELP. ENTER YOUR PHONE NUMBER TO RECEIVE A CALL FROM A TREATMENT SPECIALIST.

What Are the Stages in the Seconal Withdrawal Timeline?

Seconal withdrawal symptoms can be classified into minor and major symptoms, just like withdrawing from other barbiturates. Minor Seconal withdrawal symptoms start approximately eight to 12 hours after last taking the drug. Major symptoms of Seconal withdrawal occur about 16 hours after the last dose and may last up to about five days.

After about 15 days, the intensity of the symptoms usually subsides. But symptoms may continue for months or even years, particularly emotional and psychological symptoms.

Minor Seconal withdrawal symptoms:

  • Anxiety
  • Muscle twitching
  • Tremor
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Distorted vision
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Low blood pressure

Major Seconal withdrawal symptoms:

  • Convulsions
  • Delirium

Why Should I Detox?

Quitting drugs cold turkey can be difficult and painful. In fact, it can be not only dangerous but deadly, such as with barbiturates like Seconal.

Withdrawing on your own without professional medical help—whether cold turkey or not— can be very challenging because of the difficult physical and psychological symptoms. It’s important to find a professional, medically-assisted detox program to support you during Seconal withdrawal. This way, you will be carefully monitored in a safe environment while your body goes through the difficult, and sometimes painful, detoxification process.

Seconal Withdrawal

Participating in an addiction treatment program also gives you a better chance at lasting recovery because of the structured medical and emotional support provided.

What is the Next Treatment Step?

Withdrawing from any barbiturates can be dangerous and even deadly, and Seconal is no different. Seconal withdrawal needs to be completed under medical supervision in order to detox safely. To ensure the best opportunity for a successful recovery, it’s best to follow a full continuum of treatment. Full continuum treatment means starting with the medical detox process and then transitioning from an inpatient status to an outpatient level of treatment:

DETOX

Detox is the first stage of withdrawal treatment. During this stage, the goal is medical stabilization. The detox stage lasts from a few days up to a week. You will receive a complete medical assessment to determine your level of addiction and if you have any additional medical needs. The assessment includes a medical exam and tests to screen for drugs.

Your medical team, which includes doctors, nurses, and support staff, will monitor you to help manage uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms and prevent dangerous barbiturate withdrawal symptoms.

During the detox process, many people also experience anxiety, depression, and other emotional and psychological challenges. Your treatment plan will also include emotional support as you begin addiction therapy. A longer-term treatment plan will be put in place for you once you are medically stabilized.

RESIDENTIAL

After going through detox, you will then move on to the next stage of treatment. If you need further medical treatment after going through detox, whether for co-occurring medical conditions or post-acute withdrawal syndrome (PAWS), you will continue with the next stage of treatment on a residential basis. This is an intensive level of treatment and it includes 24/7 clinical monitoring. You will also see a therapist on a consistent basis at this stage.

INPATIENT/PARTIAL HOSPITALIZATION

Most likely if you don’t have any co-occurring conditions or difficult lingering withdrawal symptoms, you will transition to a partial hospitalization program (PHP) as your next phase of treatment. PHP is like a cross between inpatient care and outpatient treatment. You’ll stay on campus at a transitional living facility so you can focus solely on your recovery. During this stage, you will participate in a supportive, rigorous, and structured treatment program five days a week for six hours each day. Depending on your emotional and mental health needs, you will be able to participate in individual, group, and family therapy programs.

The focus at this stage will be on learning positive life skills, coping mechanisms, and techniques to help prevent relapse. These skills will help prepare you for long-term recovery and provide a solid foundation to help you begin the process of returning to your life after treatment.  

INTENSIVE OUTPATIENT

The next stage is the intensive outpatient program (IOP) level of treatment. This stage allows you to live at home while still participating in counseling and programs to support you during your recovery process. Depending on your treatment plan, you will attend about nine or more hours of therapy each week. These sessions will occur several times each week. During this time, you will continue to learn ways to cope with cravings, stress, and other issues that may come up as you continue to adjust to living independently again.

ALUMNI

After successfully completing the formal treatment program, you will have the opportunity to meet other treatment center alumni during weekly support groups and social events. You can develop new friendships and build social support with others who understand the recovery process.

Building this support network can help you continue to grow and stay focused on your recovery as you adjust to life after the treatment program and take on new responsibilities. This community can allow you to share relapse prevention strategies, new experiences, techniques to manage stress and frustration. Perhaps most importantly it can simply be a way to enjoy being with new friends.

Start Your Journey to Recovery Today

Once you’re ready to begin withdrawing safely from Seconal, contact the admissions specialists at Ocean Breeze Recovery for free and confidential help. Our specialists are available 24/7. They can provide the guidance and support you need by explaining the treatment process and answering any questions you may have. After speaking with a specialist, you will know what to expect from our evidence-based services. You’ll be prepared to make an informed decision about your addiction treatment plans.

Our specialists can also check with your private health insurance to see if your treatment costs will be fully covered. Call us today at (855) 960-5341 and let us help you get started on your journey to recovery.